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How fast is the (Lamar Jackson) clock ticking for Joe Flacco?

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http://kwese.espn.com/blog/baltimore-ravens/post/_/id/45044/how-fast-is-the-lamar-jackson-clock-ticking-for-joe-flacco

 

OWINGS MILLS, Md. -- History says the Baltimore Ravens' drafting of quarterback Lamar Jackson put Joe Flacco on notice.

Over the previous two decades, all 56 quarterbacks taken in the first round were given a shot to start within three years of being drafted.

How fast is that clock ticking for Flacco?

It depends on Flacco's play this season and Jackson's development. Flacco could be the next Alex Smith who starts for another season and then gets traded. There's a chance Jackson sits for two years and waits to step into the starting role in 2020.

 

 

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https://www.si.com/nfl/2018/05/02/lamar-jackson-joe-flacco-baltimore-ravens-starting-qb-john-harbaugh

 

 

Lamar Jackson’s Time Is Coming, Sooner Than You Think

 

Here’s an easy scenario to picture, especially if you’re a Ravens fan: It’s Sunday night, October 14. The Ravens are flying home from Nashville. They’ve just lost 13-9 to the Titans and Mike Vrabel’s surprisingly dynamic defense. Joe Flacco threw for 165 yards and completed 52% of his passes, with one interception. The offense struggled in the red zone and never quite established its running game. That’s been an issue all season, but strong defense had led to three wins in the first five weeks. But now the Ravens are 3-3 for a third-straight year, and this 3-3 feels bleaker than the last two.

Offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg, sitting near the front of the plane, leans back and takes a deep breath. He knows a Baltimore Sun columnist will call for his firing tomorrow morning. Mornhinweg turns to quarterbacks coach James Urban, seated next to him, and the two reminisce about some of the things they did on Andy Reid’s Philadelphia staff in 2010, when they were coaching Michael Vick to a near-MVP season. Remember how much more we could do schematically because of Mike’s legs? Or just how much more we could do because defenses WORRIED about those legs?

Tight ends coach Greg Roman, sitting one row behind Mornhinweg and Urban, pops his head over their seats. Roman designs much of Baltimore’s ground game, and he seizes this opportunity to tell them about when he coordinated San Francisco’s rushing attack in 2012, which featured Colin Kaepernick. Kaepernick had flaws as a passer, sure, but his legs brought enough explosiveness and dimension to still take San Francisco’s offense to Super Bowl XLVII.

WOW!!!

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What a mess it will be if the offense takes off now that they finally get him some help, sort of....

 

Either way there is no way they trade back into the first for a qb and not play him in year 2; none.

 

The fans will revolt, ... So Joe is a sitting duck, a lame one as is Harbs unless this team makes a deep run in the playoffs.

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I'm pissed at Joe. Took me long enough, but he just reads as a 9-5er, something I always knew, but thought he'd overcome.

 

Can't help but think about if Matt Ryan would be as successful if they flipped teams...

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So you know what his progressions are per each play & game?

 

You know which routes are timing routes, what his hot reads are?

There are plenty of experts who have said he does. Also watching the vid especially in slowmo you see him on one read and then to the check down right away all the time.

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There are plenty of experts who have said he does. Also watching the vid especially in slowmo you see him on one read and then to the check down right away all the time.

So you know what play was called? Maybe the check down was the number 1. Not all the time, granted, none the less, if the receiver is suppose to break his route off at 8 yards but he miss counted and breaks it off at 10 yards, that route takes a bit longer which doesn't give Joe more time because the line gives in.

 

Or, Joe throws it timed at 8 yards and the ball comes up short. So how do you know who is to blame?

 

Or, if Joe reads the safety coming on a blitz and the receiver reads it as a fake blitz and each has a different route in mind, how do you know which one is right?

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On a 10 yd 1st down the 3 yd check down is never the #1 route.

I am talking about watching Joe look at a read and after a second or so lok to the RB just past the LOS and throwing it there. Watch any other good QB and you see them look from one spot to the next to the next to the next and then go to the check down at that point. Some even go back through their reads hoping someone came open when they are not in danger.

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Billick always had a short throw to get the yac, he thought it a better option. His words, again, how do you know the play call or play design?

 

Quarterbacks look ofd safeties and sbs all the time, to move them, how do you know if Joe was doing that to open up the underneath routes?

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I have made it a point to watch Joe when he has a passing play and it sure looks to me that he's looking at 2-3 receivers most of the time. I'm not a super fan of Joe but that is what I've seen.

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