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Joe Flacco led the league in holding on to the ball

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http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2011/02/23/joe-flacco-leads-the-league-in-holding-on-to-the-ball/

 

You hear announcers say it all the time: “That sack was on the quarterback.”

 

So which quarterbacks hold on to the ball the most? According to a report by J.J. Cooper of Fanhouse, Joe Flacco was the biggest culprit in terms of self-inflicted sacks in 2010, with Ben Roethlisberger an unsurprising second.

 

Cooper watched every sack from the 2010 season, and counted how many times the quarterback held the ball longer than three seconds. Granted, this isn’t scientific. But quarterbacks know they have to release the ball in three seconds or they will be toast.

 

(SI’s Peter King wrote a great column on this topic before the season. The average quarterback releases the ball in 2.4 seconds.)

 

Flacco led the league with 25 sacks in which he held the ball over three seconds. Flacco needs to get rid of the ball quicker, although we’d argue Baltimore’s slow receivers are a major cause of the problem. The rest of the top five doesn’t contain many surprises: Roethlisberger, Jay Cutler, Michael Vick, and Jason Campbell.

 

Getting rid of the ball is definitely a skill. Consider that Roethlisberger only took 12 sacks where he held the ball three seconds or less. That’s fewer than Eli Manning and Peyton Manning took.

 

While Flacco and Roethlisberger took 45 combined sacks where they held the ball for more than three seconds, the Manning brothers only had one apiece.

 

That’s on the quarterback.

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4 out of the top 5 "I hold onto the ball too longers" were in the playoffs, with one in the Super Bowl...

 

Good point. You have to take this stat with a grain of salt. Would you rather have Flacco, who holds the ball but protects it (25TD - 10 INT) or Eli, who makes quick reads, but turns the ball over at higher rate (31TD-25INT)? The post mentioned Flacco and Roethlisberger took 45 combined 3+ second sacks compared to 1 from the Manning brothers, but look at their combined INT totals as well: Flacco & Roeth: 15INT vs the Mannings: 42 combined INTs.

 

AFCN football, it may not be pretty but it works!

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Ideally you make better faster reads and that helps.

Its like the interception he threw week 17 against the Bengals.

He leaves the pocket after almost 4 seconds even though he may not need to yet. Maybe he did, but either way the line did at least OK.

The he runs and underthrows a pass to Heap.

More importantly he misses Heap seconds before when he was wide open. Heap was wide open as he ran down the field.

Joe's double whammy both in one play. Cant see his targets and holds on way too long.

Yet most people were blaming the line after that play.

 

http://www.nfl.com/videos/cincinnati-bengals/09000d5d81d62dd5

 

Oh well, lots of things to work on and upgrade between now and whenever the next season starts.

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Breaking from the pocket early is a product of not having trust in your line. I think many issues with the offense go to the Line not being what was expected.

 

Agreed and then add the lack of speed from recievers.

 

In that Bengals game.. Pressure on Joe and Heap getting free happend almost at the same time, and then there is what two seconds when Joe just had to avoid the sack, yeah Heap is on a island, Joe is not! If he had released it sooner bad things migth have happend anyway, at least that was what Joe was thinking. Of Joes picks this one is not one of them I hate.

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Hmmmmm, I'm not a rocket scientist, but if you don't have the speed at WR to develop long routes, maybe the OC shortens the routes??? Maybe??? Hmmmm.

 

Seems Boldin was a beast in Arizona when you gave him the ball on slants and screens with space. Here, let's ask him to run 30 yard routes. Ugggghhhh, nothing like asking a player to do what they are not good at.

 

You know every book on management, performance, and leadership always says one thing. Do what you're good at and know what your people are good at. Think Cam is aware of that or just has an Alpha personality in which he says, do it or else, cuz.....well I don't know why...but you're gonna anyway!

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This has been a good thread. I agree with those who say we have to look at Joe's very low interception rate, the offensive line protection, and, of course, the routes Cam has the receivers run.

 

I will say that Joe could possibly throw the ball the away a LITTLE more often rather than take a sack.

 

Our receivers patterns are too similar. While we shouldn't give up on the long ball, we have got to use more slants and picks and better executed WR screens.

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